Minimal embarrassment at the sushi restaurant Manners

Sushi Etiquette 101: How not to embarrass yourself at a sushi restaurant

Sushi is one of the national dishes of Japan. In many high-end sushi restaurants, and the various etiquettes and rules may be overwhelming, it may be harder to try out these types of restaurants.

So, to help you feel more comfortable, let’s introduce some etiquette when eating at a sushi restaurant.

Book a reservations

It is better to reserve in advance if you are not a regular customer of the restaurant.

When you call to book a reservation, it is common to share what your budget is and tell the chef if you would like to order your favorites, or if you want them to build a menu for you. Also, do not forget if there is a type of fish that you don’t fancy, so they can adjust the dishes they will serve you excluding the type of sushi you do not like. It will also make it easier for the restaurant to adjust for you.

 

How to sit by the counter

Seats are often prepared in advance when you make reservations. But in situations where you can sit anywhere, you might get lost on where to sit. Though it isn’t a set rule, it is usually a tacit understanding that the Kamiza or the upper seats are reserved for regular customers or higher ranking persons or superiors.

Depending on the restaurant you go to, the seats farther from the door or seats closer to the Taisho also known as the head chef are usually reserved for regular customers. At older restaurants that have been around for a long time, certain seats are reserved for regular customers. If the kamiza seats are empty, it is safer to ask the staff if you can sit on them.

Tips for ordering

This may not necessarily the etiquette in eating sushi, but ordering from “lighter to thicker” is an indicator for deliciously eating sushi. For example, first order white fish, then Toro, silvered skinned fish, squid, egg, shellfish, then shrimp. If you first ordered sushi that has thicker or stronger taste, when you move on to the lighter tasting sushi, the taste may not be as apparent or it may take away the flavor, so it is best that you consider the order of your sushi in advance as well.

 

Chopsticks or bare hands?

It is said that a true born and bread of Tokyo should eat sushi with their bare hands with no care. But using chopsticks is also an acceptable way of eating sushi.

But the part of the fish must be dipped in the soy sauce and not the rice. If you will be using chopsticks, you can flip your sushi sideways tucking both rice called the Shari and the fish, also known as the Neta with your chopsticks making it easier to put soy sauce on the Neta.

Since the freshness of the ingredients is the life of sushi, the rule is to eat it as soon as possible when served.

Do not wear perfume

Sushi is a delicate dish where you can enjoy the taste of fresh seafood ingredients. As a result, a strong smell can get in the way of eating sushi. It will also be in the way of other customers. For some restaurants, the customers may be declined to enter if their scent is too strong. So, to be sure, you should avoid wearing strong scented perfume or detergent.

 

Avoid smoking cigarettes

As with perfumes and softening detergents, tobacco may also impair the taste of sushi.

Although there are restaurants where ashtrays are placed, it is recommended to refrain from smoking in consideration to other customers. But, if you absolutely want to smoke, we recommend that you choose a shop that has separate smoking rooms.

 

Take off watches and bracelets

It is not uncommon for sushi restaurants to use a single sheet of wood for their countertops. In high-end restaurants, it isn’t rare to find a countertop that may value up to millions. Often times, soft wood material is used, making it easy to scratch and damage. To avoid accidentally damaging them, try to take off your wrist watches or bracelets.

Do not use the word “Oaiso”

At a sushi restaurant, the staff often uses jargon such as “Agari” for green tea, soy sauce as “Murasaki”, and many others. But these are terms used only by the restaurant’s staff, and not by its customer. Another example is the term “Oaiso”, it is generally known to be mean the bill, and considered to be an etiquette to use this term, but this is also a term that only the restaurant staff uses when speaking with customers, so it is better not to use it if you are visiting a restaurant as a customer.

 

Summary

What did you think?

Keep these tips in mind, and have fun eating sushi!

(Funny Video)Bad  case at the sushi restaurant Manners

 

 

 How to eat sushi(A bit difficult)

This blog about Japanese culture, food and beverage, also healthy life. This is my blog and my journey to find the way to enjoy my life. I will simply give you my perspective, for valuable information and what it's worth. I really appreciate for visiting my blog. Talk to you soon.

ABOUTこの記事をかいた人

This blog about Japanese culture, food and beverage, also healthy life. This is my blog and my journey to find the way to enjoy my life. I will simply give you my perspective, for valuable information and what it's worth. I really appreciate for visiting my blog. Talk to you soon.